6 Reasons to Avoid Low Testosterone Treatment on the NHS

6 Reasons to Avoid Low Testosterone Treatment on the NHS

The National Health Service, also known as the NHS, is one of the UK’s most cherished institutions. It was the brainchild of Aneurin Bevan, who launched it in 1948.

His vision was to unite medical professionals such as doctors, dentists, nurses, etc. all under one umbrella. Financed by taxation, it would be free for people to use.

The original vision of the NHS was a noble one. As an institution, it has served the UK with distinction for decades. However, one of its downfalls is its highly centralized model.

As a result, it tends to use a “standard model of care” for most conditions. This may be OK for some things. But when it comes to a highly individualized treatment, such as testosterone replacement therapy, the NHS is completely out of its depth.

I myself have been through the NHS grinder seeking treatment for low testosterone. And overall, I found the NHS to be completely out of its depth when it comes to treating hypogonadism.

In this article, I give 7 reasons why you should avoid treatment for low testosterone on the NHS.

#1 Dismissive Doctors

When seeking treatment on the NHS for low testosterone, one of the problems many patients come across is dismissive doctors.

Indeed, I recall the first time I went to see an NHS doctor about low testosterone. Despite having all the hallmark symptoms of low testosterone, he told me I was “too young to worry about low testosterone.”

He did no further investigation on the matter. Although he did prescribe me medication, but I never took it because I knew taking pills wouldn’t solve anything.

I’ve seen this happen time and again to other men. They suffer with depression, anxiety, low libido and a host of other symptoms.

After doing research, they conclude it might be to do with low testosterone. As a result, they take their low testosterone symptoms to an NHS doctor in the hope of finding someone sympathetic to their plight. But more often than not, they’re told their symptoms have “nothing to do with testosterone.”
dismissive doctor
How dare a patient speculate on what’s wrong with their own body! A preposterous idea indeed…

Doctors are held in high because they spend years studying medicine. Yet this doesn’t excuse the “holier than thou” attitude and disdain they have for patients who come to see them about low testosterone.

#2 Patients Treated Like Criminals

Often, men seeking low testosterone treatment with the NHS are treated like criminals. Doctors and nurses alike accuse them of wanting to take testosterone for bodybuilding purposes.

There is a small minority of men who try to get a prescription for testosterone for vanity purposes. But the vast majority of men seek treatment simply because they feel like SHIT.

When a woman seeks treatment for hormonal imbalance they are applauded for “taking control of their health!” Yet when a man does it, many doctors take an accusatory tone…

How dare you think about testosterone replacement therapy on the NHS! The fact you’re breathing is enough and you should be grateful!

If you’re a man over 50 years old, it’s more than likely doctors will tell you that low testosterone is “part of aging”. And you’ll simply have to get on with it.

And if you’re a young man with low testosterone? Forget it! You have a better chance of voyaging to Mars and getting a prescription there.

But is it a crime that a man should care about his own health?

Or should he live in the abject misery of low testosterone?

Apparently, being a man and looking after your health is a crime

I know men who have been turned away by NHS doctors. So they self-medicated with black market testosterone because they felt they had no other choice:

It was either self-medicate or suffer the anguish of low testosterone.

Many of these men use testosterone therapy diligently and in therapeutic doses. later when they try to get a prescription legally, because they chose to self-medicate doctors treat them like criminals.

However, doctors need to drop their self-righteous tone. And instead of accusing patients, they should consider why patients feel compelled to self-medicate in the first place.

#3 Obsessed with Numbers

Nowadays, instead of actually treating the patient, it seems doctors are more concerned with chasing lab numbers. And this is definitely the case with the NHS guidelines for the treatment of low testosterone.

In medicine, guidelines are there to ensure a high level of patient care and prevent malpractice.

The problem here though is that the existing guidelines are a joke. As far as the NHS is concerned, a “normal” level of testosterone is between 8-29.6 nmol/l (230 – 830 ng/dl).

So for example, if your blood test shows you have a serum testosterone level of 9 nmol/l, then congratulations – you are “NORMAL!”

These “clinical guidelines” are arbitrary numbers that have no basis in optimal health. But then again the NHS is in the business of treating the sick, and doesn’t care much for optimal health…

The guidelines dreamt up by CLUELESS academics and researchers who have no first hand experience of low testosterone. They do not understand the torment of low testosterone. If they did, they would not create ridiculous guidelines that condemn men to misery.
crazy doctor
As a result, doctors prefer to treat patients based on lab numbers rather than symptoms.

Here’s a typical scenario:

A patient might their doctor complaining with the symptoms of hypogonadism (low testosterone), i.e. depression, anxiety, low sex drive, etc. However, if the patient has a “normal” level of testosterone, then the doctor will send them away.

Because guess what? His testosterone level is absolutely normal! Although if he’s lucky, he’ll the patient some antidepressants for his troubles!

The patient goes away confused. He knows something is not quite right, but the doctor insists everything is OK. He suffers with terrible symptoms. And yet the one person he looked to for answers tells him nothing is wrong.

This only adds to his pain and despair. Eventually, he gives up hope and concludes there’s nothing he can do about it.

#4 Lack of Knowledge

The United States is the world leader in testosterone replacement therapy. There you can find the most progressive doctors and the best research on the topic.

In recent years, American treatment protocols have evolved considerably and have become more patient-centric. Leading American doctors, such as Dr. Keith Nichols and Dr. John Crisler recognize the importance of frequent injections (as a minimum 1-2 x weekly). Dr. Nichols has even developed his own protocol of scrotal application of testosterone cream with outstanding results.

These doctors developed these protocols, and adapted their approach after treating thousands of patients first-hand.
However, this patient-centric and approach has not yet filtered down to the UK. The knowledge and experience is simply not there.

Doctors still adhere to textbook guidelines from the 70s that say patients must inject once every 2-3 weeks.Even endocrinologists – “experts” in the human endocrine system – follow this approach.

However, injections once every 2-3 weeks result in an initial elevation of blood testosterone, followed by a significant drop. These are known as “peaks and valleys.”

The first week after the injection you feel great; energetic and positive. But in the second week you start to feel lethargic; your sex drive diminishes, and you feel depressed.

In contrast, frequent injections maintain stable levels of blood testosterone. This allows patients to receive the full benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, avoiding the rollercoaster ride when testosterone levels drop.

If your doctor tells to inject any less than once as a week; at MINIMUM, change doctor immediately.

The fact is, most doctors know nothing about hormone optimization or testosterone replacement therapy. Whether in the US or the UK. So expecting them to help you is like your car braking down and asking your grandma to fix it.

You need to find a specialist to treat you – I’ll address this at the end of the article.

#5 Bureaucracy and Micro Management

However, this patient-centric and approach has not yet filtered down to the UK. The knowledge and experience is simply not there.

Doctors still adhere to textbook guidelines from the 70s that say patients must inject once every 2-3 weeks.Even endocrinologists – “experts” in the human endocrine system – follow this approach.

However, injections once every 2-3 weeks result in an initial elevation of blood testosterone, followed by a significant drop. These are known as “peaks and valleys.”

The first week after the injection you feel great; energetic and positive. But in the second week you start to feel lethargic; your sex drive diminishes, and you feel depressed.

In contrast, frequent injections maintain stable levels of blood testosterone. This allows patients to receive the full benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, avoiding the rollercoaster ride when testosterone levels drop.

If your doctor tells to inject any less than once as a week; at MINIMUM, change doctor immediately.

The fact is, most doctors know nothing about hormone optimization or testosterone replacement therapy. Whether in the US or the UK. So expecting them to help you is like your car braking down and asking your grandma to fix it.

You need to find a specialist to treat you – I’ll address this at the end of the article.

The NHS is highly-centralized. As a result, patients have to go through a kind of chain of command in order to receive low testosterone treatment. Or any treatment for that matter.

First, the patient must make an appointment with their local GP. Depending on the area, he may have to wait several weeks to see the doctor.

Prior to treatment – that’s if his GP lets him take a blood test and he qualifies for it – he must be referred to an endocrinologist. It may take weeks or even months to see an endocrinologist.

I myself qualified for treatment on the NHS because my testosterone was akin to an 80 year old. But the waiting list to see the endocrinologist was up to five months.

I didn’t want to suffer the anguish of low testosterone for that long. So I decided to seek treatment privately instead. It was one of the best decisions I ever made, because I saw a doctor and got treated almost immediately.

Even if you do manage to get an appointment to see an endocrinologist – there are no guarantees. I have lost count of men who told me their endocrinologist turned them away because their testosterone was “normal.” (What the hell does normal mean anyway?).

This is despite the fact their GP originally referred them because they had SYMPTOMS of low testosterone.

If you are fortunate enough (debatable) to be treated by an endocrinologist, you may have to wait weeks for approval of your treatment by a panel.

Testosterone is so dangerous to men – because who knows, it might even make them healthy! Subsequently, any low testosterone treatment with the NHS must be approved by a special commission.

#6 Limited Resources

What a JOKE.

Despite its drawbacks, the NHS does the best it can be with its limited resources. Many doctors surgeries are bloated with too many patients. Therefore, appointment times may be limited to 5-10 minutes max.

Do you think that’s enough time to make a thorough diagnosis for low testosterone?

Of course not.

But it’s enough time to prescribe to antidepressants to cure the ‘depression’ you’re suffering from!

What’s more, limited resources mean doctors try to save money where possible. This means patients don’t get blood tests because their case is not “severe enough.” And when they do receive treatment, they don’t get proper treatment protocols – because that costs money!

For example, one form of treatment that the NHS favors for testosterone replacement therapy is Nebido/ This type of treatment means a big dose of testosterone, followed by another 12 weeks later.

It’s great in theory, as patients need to inject less frequently, meaning they use less resources. But what happens is; patients see an initial surge in blood testosterone, and they feel great for a few weeks.

But then testosterone levels start to drop off… And by week five or six they feel terrible. However, they still have to wait another six weeks until the next injection! I wouldn’t wish this kind of treatment protocol on my worst enemy.

To me, this is cruel and bordering on medical malpractice. But hey, it’s testosterone right? These men should be lucky just receive it!

Final Thoughts

After reading this article you may be forgiven for thinking I have an axe to grind with the NHS. But that’s far from the truth.

I respect the medical professionals within the NHS. They do the best they can, despite being let down by the political class.

Staff are underpaid, overworked, and expected to perform miracles. And with the way they’re treated, it’s a miracle they work at all.

But the fact is, the NHS remains in the STONE AGE when it comes to testosterone replacement therapy.

Everyday countless men suffer, because the NHS has no idea how to diagnose and treat low testosterone effectively. There is an epidemic of low testosterone, not just in the UK, but worldwide. And it isn’t going away any time soon.

Until the NHS chooses to drop its arrogant “know it all” attitude and becomes more progressive, you must avoid low testosterone treatment with the NHS.

Does this mean private treatment for TRT is far superior to the NHS? Not necessarily. In fact, because most doctors train in the NHS; they take this attitude with them to the private sector. Hence why it’s imperative you find the right doctor.

You’ll have to pay for private treatment. But nothing in life worth having comes without some kind of cost.

Sadly, many UK men are so indoctrinated with the idea of the NHS. Therefore, they simply cannot fathom paying toward their own health. Imagine that – investing in your own health.

Yet they pay for the NHS via taxes, but that doesn’t count right?

The private sector is by no means perfect. However, it’s more likely you will get the type of treatment you want.

The doctor is likely more experienced and specializes in hormone replacement therapy and low testosterone treatment. And what’s more, they can be more flexible in their approach to treatment. Whereas an NHS doctor will typically stick rigidly to treatment guidelines.

However, low testosterone does not necessarily mean you need testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In my experience, many men are able to boost their testosterone levels through nutritional and lifestyle changes.

But the problem is, most guys have no clue where to start…

If you’re in the UK and are convinced that TRT is the right option for you, I recommend you get in touch with my friends over at Balance My Hormones.

However, if you want not only to testosterone treatment on the NHS, but also lifelong medication, get in touch with me about my coaching today.

I work 1-on-1 with clients to help boost their natural testosterone levels through nutrition and lifestyle changes.

P.S.

If you haven’t already, sign up to my email list to get the first chapters of my book, Optimized Under 35, for free and daily emails on how to become the CEO of your own health.